Tech Spray Hi-K plant nutrition

Tech-Spray® products supply essential plant nutrients as part of custom spray programs for crops.  We have had growers return year after year for our Tech-Spray products.  Many tell us they are amazed at the results.  Many tell us they are amazed at the results and wish they had switched to using our products sooner.

Tech-Spray liquid concentrates are water-soluble and designed to be used with Tech-Flo® products, but may be used by themselves.  They are often used to supplement soil-applied fertilizers.

Benefits

  • prevent nutrient deficiencies
  • maintain nutrient balances in plants
  • stimulate responses influencing plant vigor, yield, and crop quality
  • compatible with each other and Tech-Flo products
  • use on vines, tree crops, vegetables, field and row crops
  • use on nursery stock, ornamentals, turf and lawns

One of our top-selling products is Tech-Spray Hi-K.

TECH-SPRAY® Hi-K

0-26-28

Available Phosphoric Acid (P2O5) . . . .  . 26.0%
Soluble Potash (K2O) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28.0%

P2O5 and Potash derived from potassium phosphates.

 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

TECH-SPRAY® Hi-K is a liquid foliar nutrient supplying the guaranteed elements in water-soluble forms. It may be used by itself or combined with TECH-FLO® products or other TECH-SPRAY formulations. The water-soluble nutrients are readily absorbed by foliage to give a rapid plant response. TECH-SPRAY Hi-K contains no nitrates, chlorides, or sulfates, has a very low salt index and a near-neutral pH.  TECH-SPRAY Hi-K is recommended for use on crops when the combination of Potash and Phosphate is beneficial.

GENERAL USES

  • mid-to-late season applications for effects on quality factors such as: sugar, color, and maturity on a wide variety of fruit, berry, vegetable, and seed crops.
  • Late summer applications are recommended for hardening of trees and vines, particularly nursery stock, to improve cold weather resistance.
  • The addition of urea gives a well-balanced  N-P-K combination. P and K are reported to contribute to improving drought tolerance in crops.
  • Helpful as an aid to recover from environmental stress conditions such as freeze damage and hail injury.
  • Potash and Phosphate are highly mobile in the plant, responses are more likely to be observed in benefits such as higher solids, earlier maturity, or improved plant vigor rather than in increased levels of P or K in leaf tissue.
  • Tomatoes have an extremely heavy demand for Potash in the latter part of the season; the developing fruit is the main sink for K which is rapidly translocated from foliage to fruit.
  • On potatoes, late season applications are recommended to help delay early vine-die.

The use of TECH-SPRAY HI-K is not restricted to late season applications. It may be applied at any time during the growing season, particularly where high Magnesium and/or Calcium levels have caused Potassium levels to become depressed or where significant amounts of Potassium have been replaced due to high Sodium content in soils or water.  Suggested rates are 1 to 4 quarts per acre per application.

FOR SPECIFIC CROP RECOMMENDATIONS INCLUDING MATERIALS, RATES, AND TIMING, PLEASE READ THE PRODUCT LABELS AND CONSULT A NUTRIENT TECHNOLOGIES REPRESENTATIVE.

THE  EFFECT  OF  TECH-SPRAY®  PRODUCTS ON  pH OF  SPRAY  WATER

The following table shows the pH obtained when TECH-SPRAY products are added to water having pH 8.0.

AMOUNT OF TECH-SPRAY  PER 100 GALLONS OF WATER

 

   TECH-SPRAY                                                        ½  Pint 1 Pint 1 Quart 2 Quarts
CZn 5.7 4.9 4.2 2.8
COPPER 5.3 3.9 2.8 2.3
IZP 6.0 4.2  3.0 2.6
MG 5.8 4.0 2.8 2.5
ZnPK 6.5 6.0 4.5 3.0

The actual pH obtained in a spray mixture will vary depending on the initial pH of the water used, its hardness (the amount and nature of dissolved salts contained in the water), and the other ingredients in the spray solution (wettable powders, emulsifiable concentrates, etc.)

As a general rule, 1 pint of TECH-SPRAY MG per 100 gallons will buffer most spray mixtures into the pH range 4 – 6.

Use caution in adding acidic buffers to spray mixtures containing soluble nitrates or chlorides, particularly potassium nitrate or calcium chloride.  These may result in phytotoxicity due to excessive free acidity.  Such combinations can be safened using one of the TECH-FLO products at the rate of 1 quart per 100 gallons.

COMPATIBILITY: TECH-SPRAY products are compatible with each other, with TECH-FLO products, and with most commonly used insecticides, miticides, and fungicides. Due to their acidic properties, they are not recommended for use with lime, lime sulfur, fixed copper fungicides, or triphenyltinhydroxide. See your NUTRI-TECH representative for detailed compatibility information.

FOR FREEZE RESISTANCE

ON TREE CROPS

TECH-FLO ZMC:

TECH-SPRAY Hi-K:

2 quarts per acre.

2 quarts per acre.

 Timing:

  • On citrus and avocados, apply shortly before freezing weather which normally can be expected around the second week in December.
  • On deciduous fruit and nut trees, apply post-harvest and in early spring at the time a freeze is anticipated or predicted.

ON GRAPES AND BERRIES

TECH-FLO ZMC:

TECH-SPRAY Hi-K:

1 quart per acre.

1 quart per acre.

Timing:     Apply just prior to anticipated freezing temperatures.

ON FIELD AND ROW CROPS

TECH-FLO ZMC:

TECH-SPRAY Hi-K:

TECH-SPRAY COPPER:

1 quart per acre.

1 quart per acre.

1 pint per acre.

Timing:     Apply just prior to anticipated freezing temperatures.

The use of foliar nutrients as frost protectants was being promoted even before publication of the research by Dr. Steven Lindow at the University of California, Berkeley, which showed that certain naturally occurring bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola act as nucleating agents for ice formation. The presence of these ice-nucleation-active bacteria results in the formation of ice crystals in plant tissue at temperatures several degrees higher than in their absence. When water in plant cells freezes, it expands and ruptures the cell walls, leading to cell necrosis. The bacteria can be killed or prevented from acting as nucleating agents, thus providing several degrees of frost protection. This discovery provided a plausible explanation for the previously observed positive effects of foliar nutrients on freeze tolerance. While the mechanism can be explained, there is no general agreement on which chemicals are most effective in controlling the ice-nucleating bacteria. Several specially formulated products are commercially available, but in controlled tests these have generally not given better results than copper-based fungicides or micronutrient mixtures. Certain urea-based products, antibiotics, anti-transpirants, and surfactants have also been claimed to be effective.

Just as low temperatures are not the only factor involved in freeze damage, it is likely that control of ice-nucleating bacteria is not the only factor involved in improving freeze resistance. Gradually lowering temperatures promote cold hardiness. Trees under long term water stress are less cold-hardy(1). Plant growth regulators play an active role in influencing freeze resistance. High gibberellin levels have been reported to increase susceptibility to environmental stress(2). During chilling, a precursor of auxin has been shown to accumulate in buds, followed by the gradual appearance of auxin(2).

Plant nutrients are capable of influencing these factors. Copper, because of its inherent fungicidal properties, is considered the most effective element for control of ice-nucleating bacteria. Zinc also has mildly fungicidal properties and has been shown to be a co-enzyme for the biosynthesis of tryptophane, a precursor of auxin(3). Potassium, Calcium, and Phosphate play important roles in freeze protection and recovery as described.

REFERENCES

  1. Parsons, L. R. Interactions among Environmental Stresses. HortScience 25(11):1363 (1990).
  2. Seeley, S. Hormonal Transduction of Environmental Stresses. HortScience 25(11):1369 (1990).
  3. Bennett, J. P. and F. Skoog. Preliminary Experiments on the Relations of Growth-Promoting Substances to the Rest Period in Fruit Trees. Plant Physiol. 13:219-225.