Post-Harvest Nutrients

PNW cherry harvest with Tech Flo foliar nutrient fertilizer products

As harvest season comes to an end, many growers and PCA’s are discussing post-harvest nutrient applications.  Many perennial crops across the west are finishing off the season stressed because of inadequate rainfall and in some cases, inadequate irrigation.

Some of the important nutrients for this time of year are Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Zinc, and Boron.  Nutrient Technologies has 2 products that are important components for most post-harvest applications: Tech-SprayTM Hi-K and Tech-GroTM B-17 Boric Acid SprayTM.

Tech-SprayTM Hi-K 0-26-28 is a water-soluble liquid concentrate that is a combination of Phosphate and Potash derived only from phosphate sources.  Many growers find the inclusion of Phosphate with their Potassium source to be ideal.  Phosphorous is essential for fall root development and an important energy source as trees come out of dormancy next season.  Potassium is very active in plant-water relations and aids in drought and freeze resistance.

Tech-GroTM B-17 Boric Acid SprayTM has been shown to supply the most effective, safest form of Boron for plants.  Including Boron in post-harvest programs has many benefits, particularly in spring health of floral parts including pollen tubules.

  TECH-GRO B-17 Solubor Borosol 10
Form of Boron Boric Acid with Polysorbygen Sodium Tetraborate Reacted Boric Acid
% Boron 17% 20.50% 10%
% Sodium 0% 10.50% 0%
Effect on water pH slightly lowers pH Raises pH Greatly raises pH

Zinc is another important nutrient to apply post-harvest, especially in deciduous trees in the Pacific Northwest where zinc deficiency is a problem.  Depending on your specific needs, we have 3 zinc containing products that are often recommended: Tech-Flo® Beta, Tech-Flo® CVN Zinc 10%, or Tech-Flo® Zeta Zinc 22%.  Ask your PCA or review our product guide to determine the best products to include in your post-harvest program.

Don’t forget- what you apply now will determine your bud break and fruit set next spring.

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